Total Eclipse Thoughts

You have to know that only something like a total eclipse would get me back on Trail Creek Road, the place in Idaho where Google Maps tried to send me, four dogs, and the RV over a cliff in June. But there I was -- Trail Creek Road, again.

There are dirt roads on public land all over between Challis and Mackay, and the public showed up to take advantage. 

You have look carefully but there is a line of cars up that mountain. But unlike other places in the country, there were no crowds or lights or traffic to speak of -- a really perfect place to view the Great American Eclipse.

We were at the Chilly Cemetery, right off Trail Creek Road. Besides those resting peacefully in their graves, there were people from Colorado, California, Las Vegas, and etc. in our little spot. 

The peeps with the giant telescope were generous with it -- I took this through the telescope with my iPhone...

The image was reversed but you can get the idea.

Alison and her husband had planned their trip west to see the total eclipse for over a year -- this was their eighth eclipse! It was helpful to have experienced eclipse watchers along. They made sure we had appropriate eyewear...

The total eclipse went quickly after over an hour of build-up as the sun was nibbled away by the moon. It was impressive, to be sure.

I have two immediate observations from my eclipse experience. First, having things line up perfectly is highly unusual. In fact, it is so unusual that people travel from all over to see it happen. Ponder that, if you will.

My second observation is this: People are so interesting. Is that an odd thing to observe about an eclipse? Let me explain.

People have passions for all different things, and they have skills and talents and knowledge in different things. The diversity is fascinating to me, and how people experience their passions is so interesting. But too often our own passions are like the moon, blocking us from seeing or appreciating the bright, burning passions of others.

The moon and the sun co-exist every single day. There is a lesson in that, I think.

I am super glad I got to experience the total eclipse and also that I was able to enjoy and observe and appreciate all those people for whom the eclipse reflects a burning passion. Very cool. What was your eclipse experience?

5 comments

by Kay on Tue, 08/22/2017 - 08:27

You were lucky to experience the total effect. Sadly, the eclipse was barely noticeable in Phoenix. I thought it would be fun to travel to my old hometown in Nebraska which was in the totality corridor but it just didn't work out. However I was able to follow television and web coverage across the country. There were great crowds at the selected viewing sites and it was amazing how emotional everyone was after their unique eclipse experience. One of the Weather Channel reporters couldn't stop crying and didn't know why. In it's own way, the eclipse got everyone to look up and experience a unified feeling we haven't had in a while.

by Mary-Ann on Tue, 08/22/2017 - 12:07

Thanks, Kay! I really appreciate your observation about how the eclipse was a unifying experience. When totality happened, even though people were spead out across the vast lanscape of Idaho, we could hear the cheers. That was a very neat experience :)

by Tom on Tue, 08/22/2017 - 10:56

The little dot in the lower left corner of the last photograph is Mercury, which never strays far from the Sun.

It was a lovely day to share with many new friends.

by CA Heidi :-) on Tue, 08/22/2017 - 15:36

Well, Karl the fog was feeling jealous yesterday morning, and brooded about his lesser status all morning, effectively making it just a gloomy, foggy day. Still, people hiked up to the open space at the end of our street to see what they could. There is a lesson there, I think.

But as we were walking the dogs, a couple hiking told us there was a bobcat pacing about, just up the street in a front yard. We were cautious; this isn't normal behavior for these shy beauties. We found the source of her worry on our neighbor's gate -- two adorable kittens that apparently learned to climb to some height while mama had her back turned. I took the dogs away to reduce stress on mama, and MY mama and another neighbor got the gate open, under the mother cat's careful, but not aggressive gaze, so she could collect her babies and depart. All got out safely, and that was to me the biggest deal of all yesterday. My goodness, those cats are gorgeous! I wanted them to all come and live in my backyard! They declined and went on their (hopefully) merry way.

~H

by Kay Lynn Odle-Moore on Wed, 08/23/2017 - 17:42

Loved your observation "People have passions for all different things, and they have skills and talents and knowledge in different things. The diversity is fascinating to me, and how people experience their passions is so interesting. But too often our own passions are like the moon, blocking us from seeing or appreciating the bright, burning passions of others." SO true. We were cloudy here in Tok, Alaska, and certainly not in an area where we could see the totality....but it was fun to see other's experiences. One of the observations that made me chuckle was that darkness in the middle of the day is nothing new to Alaskans; we call that "winter"....Ha!

Post new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
Contact © 2011 Website built and maintained by G.Sontag.